Timber Species

Timber flooring comes in a huge range of species, each with its own unique blend of colour and character. Remember, no two trees are the same and there is always some natural variation within the same timber species.
When deciding on a timber floor, consider the available colours, grades, board widths and the finish to be applied. Remember, photos and samples do not always provide an accurate representation of colour and grade. No two trees are the same and there is always some natural variation, even within the same timber species.

Australian Beech

Australian Beech

One of the most important hardwoods of Australia, Australian Beech is renowned for its strength and versatility of application. Its colouring ranges from cream to pale brown.

Australian Beech

Bamboo

Native to China, Bamboo is an incredibly hardwearing material with excellent resistance to moisture, insects and allergens. The grain pattern varies depending on the method of construction, horizontal, vertical or strand woven. Bamboo flooring exhibits subtle colour variations, ranging from a warm caramel colour to a lighter natural blond.

Australian Beech

Blackbutt

Blackbutt is a commonly grown hardwood with a straight grain and even texture. Its colouring ranges from cream to pale brown, sometimes with a slight tinge of pink.

Australian Beech

Cypress Pine

Australian Cypress is a unique Australian timber featuring characteristic golden brown colour with highlights from pale creams to yellow, and features decorative tight knots. This is a very hard wearing timber.

Australian Beech

Flooded / Rose Gum

Rose Gum has a straight grain with moderately coarse and even texture. The colouring is an attractive pale pink to red brown colour.

Australian Beech

French Oak

French Oak is an imported hardwood. Its colouring ranges from cream to pale brown, sometimes even with slight tones of pink. The grain features decorative tight knots.

Australian Beech

Ironbark

Ironbark is an extremely hard timber, with an interlocked grain and a moderately coarse texture. Grey Ironbark displays a stunning range of colours from pale brown and grey to dark chocolate brown and also dark reds. Red Ironbark has a deep, rich red colouring.

Australian Beech

Jarrah

One of the most important hardwoods of Australia, Australian Beech is renowned for its strength and versatility of application. Its colouring ranges from cream to pale brown.

Australian Beech

Karri

Found mainly in Western Australia, Jarrah is well known for its density and resistance to insect attack. It is incredibly hard, and as such is heavily used for both commercial and residential flooring. Jarrah is a beautiful rich red colour which deepens over time into a soft burgundy.

Australian Beech

Messmate

One of the world's tallest trees, Karri is native to the southwest corner of Western Australia. It has very high density and hardness. Karri is a lively red colour with overtones from pale pink to rich reddish brown.

Australian Beech

New England Oak

Messmate is a well-known hardwood species used in a variety of timber applications. It is rich in detail with an even texture and visible growth rings. Messmate varies in colour from pale browns through to light yellows with subtle hints of peach.

Australian Beech

Red Mahogany

This species is found in the New England region of New South Wales. It has a medium and even texture, with a variable grain and prominent growth rings. New England Oak's colouring ranges from soft yellows and pinks to pinkish browns.

Australian Beech

Ribbon Gum

Red Mahogany is a large tree which grows from Sydney to Northern Queensland. It is prized as a very dense timber with fine grain and deep red colouring.

Australian Beech

Spotted Gum

Mainly found in the cooler areas of Australia from the Mount Lofty Ranges of Victoria to the tablelands of New South Wales, Ribbon Gum has lovely soft pink tones.

Australian Beech

Stringybark

A very tough timber, Spotted Gum grows on Australia's east coast, from the foothills of the Snowy Mountains in Victoria to the lush coastal regions of southern Queensland. Its colour varies through pale grey browns and soft creams to a rich chocolate brown. It often features a wavy grain which can produce an attractive and highly valued fiddleback effect.

Australian Beech

Sydney Blue Gum

A blend of a number of eucalyptus varieties native to various areas of New South Wales, Stringybark features a moderately fine and even texture with a straight grain. It is generally a light coloured timber ranging from pale yellows through to soft golden hues.

Australian Beech

Tallowwood

Named for its attractive blue grey bark, Sydney Blue Gum colouring ranges from soft brown reds to deep rich reds. It has a straight grain that is sometimes interlocked.

Australian Beech

Tasmanian Oak

Tallowwood is a prestigious timber with an even and often interlocked grain. It is an exceptionally durable hardwood species with unique colour and grain structure. Tallowwood varies in colour from yellowish brown with a tinge of olive green to distinctively paler shades.

Australian Beech

Turpentine

Commonly found in Tasmania, this timber ranges from pale cream to pink and a light reddish brown. The grain is extremely straight and even. Tasmanian Oak has excellent dimensional stability, making it an ideal choice for extreme climates or over radiant heat.

Australian Beech

White Oak

Turpentine is a very durable hardwood which is commonly grown in New South Wales and southern Queensland. It has a straight grain and coarse but even texture. Turpentine varies in colour from pale pink and pale reddish brown through to darker reddish brown.

   

Images courtesy of Boral Australia.

Grades Of Timber

All timber flooring used in Australia is strictly graded to Australian Standards. Grading refers to the degree of natural marks and features. The decision between different timber grades, from a unique and striking timber with lots of natural features to a clean and consistent timber grade, really comes down to personal preference. There are three main grades of timber available:

Select Grade

Select grade timber features a low level of marks and natural characteristics. Select grade is valued for its strength, simplicity and versatility. It has a sleek, clean, uniform appearance and is perfect for modern, minimalist and traditional settings.

Standard Grade

Standard grade timber shows selective gum veins, burls, insect trails and other unusual grain effects. It is a unique and increasingly popular grade, which includes the most interesting variations and markings to enhance its character.

Character Grade

Character grade is also known as rustic or feature grade. This timber grade exhibits a high level of natural features including gum veins, knots, face checking and insect trails, and generally a larger range of colour variation. The rustic and random nature of character grade timber is perfect for those who prefer a natural appearance.

Hardness Rating

The hardness of a timber is measured by the Janka hardness test. This test measures the force required to embed an 11.28mm (0.444 in) steel ball to half its depth into wood. The Janka hardness test is the industry standard for determining the ability of a particular timber species to withstand denting and wear. In Australia, Janka results are displayed in either newtons (N) or kilonewtons (kN).
Species Janka Rating (kN)
American Oak 6.0
Australian Beech 7.5
Bamboo (horizontal) 5.87
Bamboo (vertical) 6.58
Bamboo (strand woven) 16.10
Blackbutt 9.1
Brazilian Walnut 16.37
Brushbox 9.5
Cypress Pine 6.1
Flooded / Rose Gum 7.5
Forest Reds 9.1
Ironbark 14.0
Grey Box 15.0
Jarrah 8.5
Karri 9.0
Merbau 8.56
Messmate 7.1
New England Oak 6.1
Northern Beech 7.5
Red Mahogany 12.0
Ribbon Gum 6.1
Spotted Gum 11.0
Stringybark 8.1
Sydney Blue Gum 9.01
Tallowwood 8.6
Tasmanian Oak 5.5
Turpentine 12.0
Victorian Ash 4.49